Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Communion Rails: Restoring a Sense of the Sacred

I'm for it.  After all, who told us to rip them out in the first place?

I think Deacon Kondra's article a good starting point to a needed reflection and revision on posture at communion.

Communion Rails: Restoring a Sense of the Sacred

4 comments:

Father Shelton said...

Indeed. I would like to add that the altar rail also helps tie us more clearly to our Jewish origins, revealing Christianity as the fulfillment of God's work with the nation of Israel. The rail helps us see the old Jerusalem Temple, just as the traditional silence of the Canon reminds us of the high priest's quiet work in the old Holy of Holies. In the Holy Mass, it is from the innermost "sanctuary" that Holy Communion is brought to the faithful, which they receive not at a great distance from, but right on top of, the dividing rail. It's simply brilliant architectural theology and cathechesis.

Father Shelton said...

Father Shelton, you clearly don't know what you're talking about. Christ spoke of the destruction of the Temple, and the veil in the Temple was ripped asunder. The Temple, therefore, is no model for church architecture.

Father Shelton said...

Father Shelton,
You're right, Christ did speak of a destruction of the Temple, and the veil did indeed tear, but Christ's body is the new "Temple", and his body rose again after it went down into death, thereby tearing apart the veil of death. Churches are symbols of Christ's body, and so should reflect his sacrificial work as the new Temple.

Michael said...

Father Shelton, you be kind to Father Shelton. He is a friend of mine, although we've never met.